2014 South

Zachary Thompson
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Zachary
Thompson
Position:Offensive Line
School:Emanuel Co. Institute

Player Bio

Playing in the trenches isn’t always the most glamorous place to be on the football field, but it is where battles are won and lost. No one knows that better than Emanuel County Institute’s Zack Thompson. Standing at 6-foot-5 and weighing 280 pounds, Thompson had been a force on the field on both sides of the ball during his career. He does most of his work on the offensive side of the ball, but has been named an All-Region defensive lineman as a freshman when the Bulldogs won state in 2012. Last season he was named All-Region Honorable Mention at offensive line.

So far this season, Thompson has led the way blocking for Michael Sutton who has nearly 2,000 yards rushing and the top scoring offense in region 3-A. Zack’s solid play has attracted interest from numerous schools, but the most intriguing one happens to hold some history in his family. Zack explained, “I’ve gotten mail from here and there but the school that has shown the most interest in me would be The Citadel where my dad played.” His dad has played a big role in his playing career and life in general stating, “My dad has had a big impact on the way I prepare and conduct myself since he knows what it takes to play as the next level. Also, my offensive line coaches Chad Harper and Dwayne Tabor have really instilled in me the work ethic to compete at a high level.”

He also excels away from the football field playing baseball in the spring and maintaining a 4.0 GPA. With one eye already locked on the future, Thompson has been a go-getter, “I’m #1 in my class and am a part of the Accel program and currently taking college classes at East Georgia State College.” With so much going on in his life, Zack has been the prime example of how a student-athlete should operate. With all his success, he still manages to stay humble saying, “I’m really excited to be chosen to from a small, 1-A school and to have the opportunity to compete with the best juniors in the state.”